Saturday, December 31, 2011

doosra ball grip | doosra ball grip ball | How to bowl a “Doosra” in cricket?

doosra ball grip | doosra ball grip ball | How to bowl a “Doosra” in cricket?


doora ball grip:
Doosra is the bowling variation of the .This type of delivery was popularised by the pakistani bowler Saqlain Mushtaq.The term “doosra” is an hindi word which means the “other one”.
Other notable Doosra bowlers are murali,Johan Botha,Harbhajan Singh,Shoaib Malik and Saeed Ajmal.
History of Doosra
It is said that Saqlain Mushtaq invented the delivery.The then wicket keeper of Pakistan Moin Khan frequently shouted the word “Doosra” to Saqlain Mushtaq as a sign to bowl that kind of delivery.And in no time it became a delivery in the Off Spinner’s armoury.
Doosra Defined
Simply,we can define a Doosra as the Off-Spinner’s version of Googly.It is bowled with the same action as that of the Off Spinner but the ball turns from leg side to off side or sometimes it goes straight without any spin which surprises the batsman.
Technique and Grip of Doosra
Doosra bowling grip
Comparison between off break and Doosra
The bowler delivers the ball with the same finger action as that of the normal off break but cocks the wrist so that the back side of the hand faces the batsman.This generates the spin of the ball in the other direction that is from legside to off side.
This is also possible for
off spinner orthodx bowler to bowl the doosra.But in this case the ball would tun from the off side to the leg side.Rangana Herath of Sri Lanka and Monty Panesar of England is an example for this.

Thursday, May 5, 2011

Cricket Tips Spin Bowling

A leg spin bowler spins the ball from a right handed batsmans leg stump towards their off stump. The bowler grips the ball with the top joint of the index and middle fingers lying on the seam and the third finger bent along it.

As the bowlers arm moves forward the fingers are straightened and the wrist is flicked forwards, with the palm finishing facing downwards. The 3rd finger is the one that imparts most of the spin.

On release of the ball the bowler completes a full swing of the arm, driving through to the opposite hip. Its important to pivot on the ball of the front foot and make the back knee drive through the ball.

Coaching Points

  • Ensure the head remains stationary during the delivery and that the eyes remain focused on the target.
  • A leg spinners run is considerably shorter than a quick bowlers although like a fast bowler the approach needs to be smooth and accelerating to the wicket.

Cricket Bowling Tips….the basic grip

The bowling grip on the ball is the basis of good bowling flight and direction (line and length). The bowling action contributes to the ball flight, but the correct bowling grip is of paramount importance to all bowlers. Obviously, spin bowling has a different grip process and will be covered in another article on “spin bowling grip”.

DO NOT SQUEEZE YOUR FINGERS ON THE BALL.

Hold the ball just with enough pressure that the ball does not fall out of your hand.

Grip the cricket ball with first and second fingers on either side of the seam so that the seam line faces down the target line.

Basic bowling grip

Basic bowling grip

Pic 1

The front on view of the grip on the ball with the seam facing down the target line.

Position the ball to towards the end if your finger tips

Thumb..just off seam

Thumb..just off seam

Pic 2

The under view of the thumb under the ball.

The thumb will rest to one side of the seam allows freedom of ball flight.

Pic 3... direction of seam at point of delivery

Pic 3... direction of seam at point of delivery

Pic 3

The view of the seam at the point of delivery, with the wrist bent to ad back spin on the ball. This gives pace and swing.


Cricket Bowling Line And Length

Whether you are a cricket coach, junior cricket player or a senior cricket player, there is one practice drill all cricket bowlers need to focus on, regularly. As a cricket player you have learnt “HOW” to bowl but not necessary “WHERE” to bowl.

LINE and LENGTH

You’ve heard it time and time again, that you need to bowl line and length, but what does it really mean to a young cricket player or a senior player who may have forgotten this holy grail of cricket bowling?

HITTING TARGETS

Cricket is a simple game of HITTING TARGETS. The straightest line for a right hand bowler, bowling over the bowlers end stumps, to a right hand batsman, is that imaginary line that runs from the offside bowler’s end stump to the right handed batsman’s offside stump. This is the TARGET line FOR ALL BOWLERS.

Therefore the TARGET LINE is the batsman’s OFF STUMP. Fast bowlers, medium paced bowlers, off-spin bowlers, leg-break bowlers, the TARGET LINE stays the same.

VARIATION

If the bowler’s line stays constant, it’s a simple matter of varying the pace of the ball.

This is known as bowling along the“the corridor of uncertainty” if the bowling length is correct. With the right line and length, it creates uncertainty to the batsman, “do I hit the ball, defend the ball or simply let it go through to the keeper”.

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Drills:

There are a number of different drills which you can use to improve your spin bowling. However bowling at a target is probably one of the best: mark out an area on the wicket which represents a good line and length using chalk, paint or markers. Aim to bowl every bowl in to this area and turn the ball so that it hits the stumps. You can adjust this zone depending on the type of spin you are bowling, the stance of the batter (left or right handed) and the pitch conditions. You can also incorporate obstacles for bowlers to bowl over, to practice varying flight and pitching it in same spot.

The Googly and the Doosra: Deceptive deliveries

The googly is bowled by a leg spinner and is a ball that appears to look like a leg spinner when it’s bowled but then moves unexpectedly in the opposite direction after it pitches. It’s bowled out of the back of the hand and requires the shoulder to be dropped a little at the point of release. A great example of a bowler who has mastered the googly is Shane Warne.

The doosra is bowled by an off spinner and is a ball that initially seems to look like an off spinner when it’s bowled but then moves unexpectedly in the opposite direction after it pitches. The doosra has been pioneered by the Sri Lanka great Muttiah Muralitharan and is very difficult to bowl, Muralitharan reputedly practiced the delivery for 2-3 years in the nets and practice before using it in first class cricket…I can’t bowl it so I’m not going to go into it!

The power and rotation on the ball are generated through a strong action and is enhanced by flicking the wrist and straightening the fingers at the point of release. Always try and spin the ball as much as you can, your consistency and accuracy will come with practice and hard work. Remember to bowl your spinners with oomph and purpose, don’t just throw it up and hope for the best.

Tip- Examine the pitch before bowling and try to identify areas of rough, cracks and other features on the wicket to aim at which may cause increased spin, variable bounce or erratic ball behaviour when pitched on and aim to bowl the ball into these areas provided they don’t cause you to bowl bad deliveries (e.g. short and wide).

The delivery:

The off spin delivery should start with an angled and short delivery stride. You should then pivot on ball of the front foot keeping your bowling arm high. Cock your wrist inwards and drive your back leg through to help rotate the body. Release the ball by turning your wrist sharply from left to right and by pulling down on seam with the index finger to generate spin. The back of hand should face the off side or upwards at finish of the delivery, don’t forget to follow through properly. Keep your head as upright as possible throughout the delivery and your eyes fixed on the target at all times.

The leg spin delivery is very similar to the off spin except with a few subtle and important variations. Your approach should be somewhat longer and have a slightly angled approach towards the target.

As you bowl you should raise your lead arm towards the target and bowl with a braced front leg (your weight should be through this leg). Pivot on the ball of the lead foot and bring your bowling arm up high with your wrist cocked outwards. Drive your back leg through and release the ball. Generate the spin by rotating your wrist from right to left and by most importantly using the third finger to impart the most spin. Finish with your palm facing leg side.

Follow through by rotating shoulders through the line of the wickets and driving your back leg through the action so that your hips rotate over your front foot. Keep your hips and shoulders inline and head as upright as possible throughout the delivery and your eyes fixed on the target at all times.

The grip:

Leg spin: Use the first two fingers to grip the ball horizontally across the seam, your third finger should be bent and running along the seam. Your thumb should rest lightly on seam and the spin is generated primarily by the third finger.

Off spin: Again grip the ball with your first two fingers horizontally across the seam and try to spread as wide as possible apart the joints of index and middle finger. The ball then rests lightly on third finger and thumb, the spin is and produced and passed on mainly through the index finger.

Target areas:

Off spin: The off spinner aims to spin the ball from a right handed batsmen’s off side towards the leg side. Try to bowl just outside of the off stump so that the ball turns and hits the stumps, also try to entice the batsmen forward on to the front foot by bowling a full length.

Leg spin: The leg spinner aims to bowl the ball so that it spins from a right handed batsmen’s leg side to the off side. Again try to pitch the ball up to the batsman to get them coming forward. Pitch the ball inline with the wickets so that the ball turns to hit the top of the off stump.

Spin Bowling Tips

The spin bowler is a key element in the bowling line up of any cricket team, the skill of Shane Warne and Muttiah Muralitharan has highlighted the potential and the shear power and influence a high class spin bowler can have in the game of cricket. The spin bowler can be used to slow the game, add pressure and most importantly attack batsmen. The spin bowler moves the ball off the pitch turning it sideways, as the spinning ball grips the pitch and turns and can also cause it to bounce variably.

A good spin bowler needs to be able to bowl a consistent line and length, is able to turn the ball, which requires lots of practice and dedication to succeed. If you are a spin bowler you should try and experiment with varying degrees of flight, speed, and angle of approach in order to deceive the batsmen.

There are two recognised types of spin bowlers, which are, finger spinners who are classed as the orthodox technique and use their index finger (first finger) to spin the ball and the wrist spinners who use the wrist more than fingers to spin ball.

Drills:

Practice in pairs just throwing the ball to each other ensuring that the seam remains in upright in a vertical position in flight to induce the swing. Keep your wrist upright and behind the ball and flick your fingers at the point of release. Watch the ball through the air so you can see if the seam stays upright. Vary the grip to practice the different types of swing. Another drill which can be used for most bowling activities is bowling at a target zone, which should be marked out on a good line and length. Aim to bowl the ball so that it swings through the air and then pitches in the target zone.

In Swing

The in swing delivery is basically the reverse of the away swing in that when bowled from a right handed bowler it swings in towards a right handed batsmen from the off side towards the leg side. Have a straighter run up and deliver the ball slightly wider on the crease. In contrast to the away swing bowler, the in swing bowler aims to get the batsmen out LBW or bowled by pitching it up. Aim to bowl it so that it swings from outside off stump and pitches in line with middle and off stumps, be careful though because if you start it too straight it will swing down leg side and be easy for the batsman to hit away.

Tip - If you find yourself swinging the ball uncontrollably, hold the ball across the seam so that the seam runs horizontally, this will help negate and reduce the amount of swing.

You need to make sure that your bowlers and fielders are aware of which side of the ball in polished and that is constantly shined between deliveries. Most bowlers will shine the ball themselves but it is always useful to nominate one or two fielders to shine the ball as well while the bowler is walking back to his mark.

Changing weather conditions have an often noticeable affect on the amount that the cricket ball will swing. Dry hot sunny days don’t favour swing bowling, whereas overcast, cloudy conditions are found to be most influential at generating more swing. So take this into consideration when deciding who to bowl if you are captain.

Out Swing

The out swing delivery is a ball which when bowled by a right handed bowler to a right handed batsman swings from the leg side towards the off side. The aim of the out swinger is to encourage the batsman into playing a drive and ideally the swing will increase the chance of getting an edge and getting the batsmen out caught behind, so make sure you’ve got some good catchers behind the stumps. You want to pitch the ball quite full, aiming at or just outside off stump so that the batsman is forced to play at the ball.

The grip for the out swing delivery is quite simple and provided the seam is up right at the point of release it should swing. You need to hold the ball as normal for a medium paced delivery with the seam vertical, however for the out swinger the seam needs to be vertical and pointing towards first or second slip at about a 15° angle, so that your fingers will be running slight across the seam. The shiny side should face the leg side of the batsmen, thus the rough side faces the off side and the direction of swing. The increased air resistance on the rough side and seam position will cause it to swing through the air towards the offside. The run up should be slightly angled and bowled from close to the stumps.

Out Swing

The out swing delivery is a ball which when bowled by a right handed bowler to a right handed batsman swings from the leg side towards the off side. The aim of the out swinger is to encourage the batsman into playing a drive and ideally the swing will increase the chance of getting an edge and getting the batsmen out caught behind, so make sure you’ve got some good catchers behind the stumps. You want to pitch the ball quite full, aiming at or just outside off stump so that the batsman is forced to play at the ball.

The grip for the out swing delivery is quite simple and provided the seam is up right at the point of release it should swing. You need to hold the ball as normal for a medium paced delivery with the seam vertical, however for the out swinger the seam needs to be vertical and pointing towards first or second slip at about a 15° angle, so that your fingers will be running slight across the seam. The shiny side should face the leg side of the batsmen, thus the rough side faces the off side and the direction of swing. The increased air resistance on the rough side and seam position will cause it to swing through the air towards the offside. The run up should be slightly angled and bowled from close to the stumps.

cricket match tips | Successful Swing Bowling Tips

here is a cricket match tips for successful swing bowling
A bowler who has the ability to bowl swing is an important asset in any cricket match n team as swing bowling is a great way to baffle a batman, add pressure and take wickets. The swing bowler has the ability to move the ball in the air either away from the batsman or in towards the batsmen. The swing is created by holding the cricket ball in a specific way so that when it is released from the hand the varying levels of air resistance combined with the position the seam is directed causes the ball to swing in the air. The swing is accentuated by polishing and shining one side of the ball so that is smooth relative to the other side, which should get roughened up through the natural course of play. Select a side to shine at the start of the match and ensure all the bowlers and fielders know which side to polish. You can polish it by rubbing sweat into it and then rubbing it on your cricket trousers.
There are three generally recognised swing delivery types, in swing, out swing and reverse swing.

tags: cricket match tips | successful swing bowling tips | swing bowling | cricket match 

Training drills and tips

  • Practice on a wicket, by having a player throw the ball past the stumps on the off side and leg side, mix it up and get used to catching the ball either side of the stumps. Do it standing up and standing back, you’ll need to alter the pace of the throw appropriately.
  • Develop the drill above my putting a batter into the drill to act as a distraction, don’t have the batter hit the ball just get them to allow it to pass through to the keeper; it’ll help the wicket keeper get used to taking the ball down the leg side and having to deal with the blind spot which occurs as the ball passes across/in front of the batsmen.
  • Next get the batsmen to play at the ball and miss it on purpose, the easiest way is to let the ball pass inside of bat by playing wide of the ball, this is a good drill to help get used to taking the ball after been unsighted by the batsmen.
  • Have a player (wearing batting gloves to protect the hands) stand in the batsmen’s position with a pair of wicket keeping gloves, as the ball passes hit it with the gloves to create the effect of the ball catching an edge, this will help the keeper get used to deviations of the ball after the point of contact and having to react appropriately.

Start off slow and build it up, these drills will help you develop quick reactions, improve your decision making and help you become the best wicket keeper you can be. Remember to be vocal in the field and keep your team mates motivated.

Stumping

If the batsman is out of the crease after the delivery, once you’ve taken the ball, move your body weight towards stumps and move hands fast to break the wickets

Catching the ball

When you are catching the ball, aim to get your head/eyes above the line of the ball and your body behind the line of the ball. As the ball rises from the pitch, rise from the crouching position with the ball, so you mirror the height of the ball. Watch the ball into your hands and catch it with your fingers pointing downwards. You’ll need to cushion the impact of the ball hitting your gloves when catching by ‘giving’ with your hands. If the ball continues to rise as it reaches you, step with your outside foot backwards and across, rotating your body outwards, taking the ball on one side of the body.
To catch a ball delivered on the off side or leg side, move your feet and body across immediately to get your head back into line with the delivery. (Move the outside foot first and follow with the inside.) Rise with the ball as discussed above and ‘give’ with hands to reduce the impact.

If you are standing back which you should be to medium and fast bowlers take your stance as discussed above, however stand in a position so that the ball is taken once it begins to drop.

Sometimes you may have to dive to take wide deliveries or thick edges, always try to take the ball in two hands if possible, roll after the dive if you can to reduce the impact of landing and changes of injury.

Basic Technique – Wicket keeping stance

You can stand up to spin bowlers and slower paced bowlers. The wicket keepers stance is quite straight forward, you need to stand about one step behind the stumps, making sure no part of your body or equipment is in front of the line of the stumps.

Crouch down with your left foot (reverse for left hand batsmen) inline with middle stump, therefore on you are crouched a little on off side. Try to keep your head still and eyes level during the delivery to help you judge the pace and line. You should be balanced and relaxed with your weight slightly forward on the balls of your feet. Be alert and ready to react to the delivery.

Equipment for wicket keeping:

Wicket keeping gloves (and inner gloves),
-Box,
-Wicket keeping pads
-Helmet.

Wicket Keeping Tips

The wicket keeper is an essential and key part of the cricket team. wicket keeping tips each and very team needs a reliable wicket keeper. As well as taking catches, stumping the batsmen and taking run outs, the wicket keeper is one of the team’s most important players: motivating and inspiring the bowlers and fielders to raise their game and WIN.
To be a wicket keeper you need fast reactions and precise judgement as you have very little time to react to such things as fast deliveries especially if there are changes and deviations in the balls line due to variations in swing, movement off the pitch and edges.
You need to be alert and have high levels of concentration. Like a top batsmen you want to be able to ‘switch on and off’ your concentration between deliveries and overs to avoid getting mentally tired, as it’s impossible to fully concentrate non-stop for hours at a time. High levels of fitness and flexibility are also very important for a wicket keeper as it can be very tiring because you are effectively doing hundreds of squats and diving around the field. So stay fit, warm up and down and stretch thoroughly to remain in peak condition and avoid injury.

tags: wicket keeping tips | effective wicket keeping | good wicket keepin

Simple Off-Season Training Tips

When the season comes to close it can be a sad time, no more cricket to play at the weekends, no more friendly banter with opposition players and no more glory to be had for a few months at least.

However, your focus should start turning to the next season and what training strategies and techniques you can use to maximise and optimise your results next season.

Why would I want to set goals you say? Well, if you don’t know where you are going how are you ever going to get anywhere? If you want to go somewhere in life you decide exactly where you want to go and then work out a detailed plan of how you are going to get there. Setting goals and then backward planning to devise a strategy to reach these goals is key in all aspects of life not just sport.

There is a saying that is encompassed by ‘7 P’s’ which are applicable here. Now one of theses P’s might seem a bit rude so if you don’t want to read it move on now…anyway, they stand for, “Prior Planning and Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance”.

It’s imperative you understand how to set goals and plan the tiny baby steps you’re going to follow to reach them.

When you start thinking about your our pre-season training you need to be thinking about improving and maintaining your fitness, analysing your technique and plugging weaknesses and holes in it, practicing skills and drills to hone your technique, working with your team mates to improve team cohesion and team spirit, set standards and expectations for yourself and the team and also focus on planning and tactics.

Pre-season training is a massive subject area to cover in an article so I’ll just give you a few pointers to think about when you’re in pre-season training.

When you are batting focus on improving your footwork, timing and also your technique; bowlers you should practice working on your consistency, so focus on your line and length.

Work with your coach to develop your own custom plan and training program for your off-season so when it comes to an end you can be ready and raring to go.

FITNESS TIPS

Fitness (very briefly)

Fitness is very important in cricket, just like any other sport, as physical and mental fitness are intricately linked. Being and staying fit will help you remain alert and responsive for long games and is especially important for batting.

CATCHING TPS

Reflect Catches – Training Tips

Reflect catches are those where you don’t have time to think about catching the ball, but where your body responds to its training automatically, as its trained response is to try and catch the ball, such as those catches at slip or short leg, where there is only a fraction of a second to respond and take the catch.

To practice reflect catches there are a number of drills you can do:

For example, get three players, a few cricket balls and find some space on the out field.

  • One person sits on the ground with their legs out to the front and hands out ready to catch.
  • The other two players then alternately throw their ball (one at a time) to either side of the catcher, who has to try to catch the ball and return it to the thrower.
  • To make the drill harder, the thrower can increase the distance away from catcher with which they throw the ball and reduce the time between throws, so that the catcher is almost non-stop catching and returning and catching.
  • The drill then repeat itself but with the catcher moving up on to their knees, then squatting and then standing. Do a minute or two in each position before rotating on to the next person in the group.

This drill is great for reactions, speed and agility and gets very tiring for the catcher if done properly.

Other drills include using catching cradles; catching nets and the traditional one of having some one throw the ball at a batter who then deflects it to a group of fielders in a ring behind.

FIELDING TIPS THROW GRIP

The Throwing Grip

Hold the ball across the seam, as this helps generate more back spin on the ball as it travels through the air so that it carries further.

The Throw

  • Take a big stride and establish a strong side-on throwing base, with your lead foot pointing at your target and the back foot at 90 degrees to it. Stay relaxed with your knees bent.
  • Bring your throwing arm back, point with your front arm at or slightly above your target.
  • Keep throwing elbow above shoulder height.
  • As you throw bring your non-throwing arm in towards your body and rotate/push your hips and shoulders through towards your target.
  • Your throwing arm should come through the line of your target as you release the ball.
  • As you throw you should feel a slight weight transfer from the back foot to the front foot, don’t forget to allow your body to follow through naturally once you’ve released the ball.

Aim to always throw the ball above the stumps, ideally to the wicket keeper or bowler on the full (with out bouncing) or with one bounce a few meters in front of the stumps, so that it bounces up above them.

To practice throwing is simply a case of repetitive practice of throwing at the wicket keeper or at a stump or set of stumps (if you’re practicing going for direct hits run out chances). Practice at different ranges and positions on the field.

Also practice under pressure situations. You could have batsmen running between the wickets and you have to field the ball and try to run them out by getting the throw in accurately to the keeper before they complete the run(s). Practicing under pressure will help you a lot when it comes to having to perform in matches, where stopping a single or a two could make the difference between winning and losing.